History and English Language BA(Hons) 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

It’s not too late to apply for September 2017. Find out more.

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Meet our students

Elliott Land CF

Elliott talks about his time at University

About the course

We offer a broad ranging course allowing you to explore medieval and modern history and specialise within English Language and Linguistics.

We have a friendly, hands-on approach to delivering our courses. All our staff are high achievers in their research fields. 100% of the work submitted by our History staff for the last Research Assessment Exercise was internationally recognised, with 66% classed as 'world leading' or 'internationally excellent'. 86.9% of work submitted by our English Language tutors was recognised as 'world leading' or 'internationally excellent'. The University was also ranked 13th in the country (out of 90) and top in Yorkshire for History studies by The Guardian's University Guide 2015.

In the National Student Satisfaction Survey 2016, English scored 92% for overall student satisfaction, ranking us the best in Yorkshire and History scored 91%.

All of our modules aim to equip you with the skills needed by the world of work, such as good communication and analytical skills, independent and team working, and problem solving. In addition, we have innovative assessments which may include such activities such as analysing children's speech development, making a podcast on 1970s culture, or creating a visitor trail for a national museum. We were also the first university English and History department to introduce a work placement module.

Here's what current History student Claire has to say about her course.

See what current English Language student Elliott has to say about his course.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.


UCAS code:
VQ31

Start date:
18 / 09 / 2017

Duration:

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

5 years part-time

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this course are normally one of the following:

•  BBB at A Level including a minimum grade B in History or English Language

•  DDM in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

•  120 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications including a minimum grade B at A Level in History or English Language or preferably both

•  Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above to include History or English Language components

•  Pass International Baccalaureate with an overall score of 31 points to include History or English Language components.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements at http://www.hud.ac.uk/undergraduate/howtoapply/entryrequirements/

Please note: UCAS points are based on the new UCAS tariff, introduced for courses starting in 2017/18.

Contact:

Admissions Tutor

Tel: +44 (0)1484 472466

Email: history@hud.ac.uk

Follow us on Twitter @Historyathud
Visit our Facebook page

Places available:

20

(this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Find out how to apply Book on an Open Day Order a prospectus Ask a question

Course content

Year 1

History

Core modules:

Early Medieval Europe: c500 - 1215

This module covers the history of, what was to become, Europe from the decline of the Western Roman Empire to the end of the 11th Century. It explores the religious and social history of the period, in a range of geographic locations and ethnic groups, from Scandinavia to the Eastern Mediterranean. You’ll have the opportunity to examine written sources alongside visual representations and material culture. You’ll also be advised how to find, evaluate and reference supporting material for your work; how to identify arguments and structure essays and document analyses; and how to present material orally, as well as in writing.


Twentieth Century Britain

Using a chronological and thematic approach, you'll be introduced to the major political, social, economic and cultural developments affecting British society in the 20th Century. This module falls within the ‘Communities and Welfare Research Group’ at the University and explores how Britons identified themselves with a variety of communities, relating to place, gender, class and other affiliations. It also explores the development of social policy in relation to the welfare state.

English Language

Core module:

Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

This module introduces you to the structure of language as a system. You'll be able to explore the basics of linguistic description, using mostly, but not only, the English language to illustrate. The module focuses on the fundamental linguistic concept of ‘levels’ of language, starting from the smallest (sounds) and building up to sentence structure. Emphasis is on the development of practical skills in analysing language structure. This module will be assessed by a mixture of coursework assessments and formal examinations.

Option modules:

Two options from a list which may include-

Approaches to Language Study

This module introduces you to a number of theoretical, analytical and methodological advances that have had a significant impact on the development of linguistics as a discipline. You will be introduced to principal ideas in linguistics and practical issues in carrying out research into language. The module thus acts as a precursor to many of the issues that will be explored in greater detail in years 2 and 3 of the course, and is designed to enthuse you about the value of studying language.


Introduction to Stylistics

This module introduces you to the linguistic analysis of literary and other texts. The focus is on describing and explaining the relationship between linguistic choices and poetic effects in the three major literary genres of poetry, drama and prose fiction. In the lectures you are introduced to a range of analytical tools for describing and explaining meaning and effect, and in seminars you are given the opportunity to test out your understanding by applying these tools to the analysis of a number of extracts from literary texts. The emphasis throughout the course is on you developing practical analytical skills.


History of English

This module introduces you to the history of the English language from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. You'll have the opportunity to focus on how English has developed historically, from its earliest origins in the Old English period, through its development into Middle English and then Early Modern English, to its present-day status as a global language. The key theme of the module is how English varies over time, and you'll be encouraged to examine how intra- and extra-linguistic factors have caused this.


Introduction to Contrastive Linguistics

This module will give you an introduction to contrasting English with another language of your choice, for the purpose of learning more about language structure in general. You'll be asked to compare the given languages at the pragmatic, lexical, semantic, morpho-syntactic and phonological levels. The close examination of difference and universality aims to give you a foundation in key aspects of cross-linguistic study, and skills which are transferrable to language learning, teaching and translation.

Year 2

History

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Placements

The course offers a compulsory 6 week work placement in Year 2. Previous placement providers have included Pen and Sword Books, Oldham Evening Chronicle, Lotherton Hall, Rochdale Law Centre, The Royal Armouries Museum, DIG York Archaeological Trust, Leeds Mencap, Cancer Research UK, Poplars Farm Primary School, Aviva Insurance and the National Media Museum and a range of primary and secondary schools.

The ERASMUS+ exchange provides an optional short term (12 or 24 weeks) opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner universities where you join in classes and receive credits towards your degree at the same time. We have partnerships with universities in Athens, Ghent, Granada, Hanover, Paris and the USA.

Career opportunities

95% of graduates from courses in this subject area go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating. Studying history allows you to keep your career options open. Our graduates have gone on to a variety of careers within libraries, archives, the media, industry and the voluntary sector, PR, law, politics and accountancy. A selection of companies that have employed Huddersfield graduates in recent years include English Heritage, The National Trust, The Royal Armouries, British Waterways and Eureka Museum. Others have opted for PGCE study and have become teachers, or continued their studies at Master's level.

Becoming a graduate in an English discipline, you are valued for the advanced skills you have developed in communication, self-motivation, teamwork, analysis, creative problem solving and persuasiveness. Studying history alongside English allows you to keep your career options open. Depending on your specialism, your career choices are as varied and exciting as your degree course.

Our graduates have gone on to a variety of careers within publishing, broadcasting, teaching, writing, advertising, management, politics, local government, archives, the media, PR, law, politics and accountancy.

A selection of companies that have employed Huddersfield graduates in recent years include BBC, Zurich Financial Services, O2, English Heritage, The National Trust, The Royal Armouries, British Waterways and Eureka Museum*. Others have opted for PGCE study and have become teachers, or continued their studies at Master's level. *Source: Linked In.

Teaching and assessment

12% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, tutorials etc. You'll have the opportunity to take part in interactive lectures and workshops; as well as seminars in which you'll be encouraged to participate – whether it be in smaller ‘buzz groups' or in role-playing sessions. IT is a strong feature of our teaching with opportunities to learn by using digital recording equipment, corpus databases, or by obtaining teaching resources online. Some of your submissions may involve producing a podcast, contributing to an exhibition or analysing large datasets of historic English. Assessment will include essays, reports, exams, oral presentations and a dissertation.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results.Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of the teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.*

*permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching.

Facilities

Our facilities are continually being updated with cutting edge technology to support your learning. IT facilities in West Building, where History and English are housed, include flexible learning rooms equipped with video conferencing equipment, interactive smart boards with all-round ceiling projection and audio-visual cabinets with the usual CD/DVD playback and pc and laptop connections. We are in the early stages of planning a new purpose-built building.

In the University Library and Computing Centre (LCC), you will find History and English subject specialists to help you find and use source materials. There are collections on books, journals, newspaper articles, and electronic access to a wide range of journals, parliamentary papers, state papers, newspapers and other resources, including an extensive collection of archival material.

The English section contains our rapidly-expanding collection of linguistics materials, including journal and newspaper articles, books, audio recordings, and a range of electronic databases (such as Early English Books Online) and several linguistic corpora (eg the 100-million-word British National Corpus), together with the software for their analysis.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the tuition fee for UK and EU students at the University of Huddersfield will be £9,250.

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.

If you decide to apply for a course that includes a work placement, a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check may be required to enable you to undertake that placement in settings with children (e.g. within a School). Should the organisation you are going to be working in require one to be undertaken, the School will support you to apply for a check. Please note that there is a charge for the DBS check which is approximately £44.

Further study

Progression to a postgraduate course is dependent on successful completion of your undergraduate studies, there may also be minimum qualification requirements such as a first class or higher second (2.1) degree. Please check the course details to confirm this.

You may be interested in studying: History MA History (MA by Research) Business English and Intercultural Communication MA English Language and Applied Linguistics MA English Language and Applied Linguistics MA(Distance Learning) Intercultural Communication MA Communication Cultural and Media Studies (MA by Research) English Language and Literature (MA by Research)

International

If you're an international student (including EU) you can check if you meet our entry requirements (both academic and English language) by visiting our country pages.

If you do not meet the entry requirements you can consider completing a degree preparation programme (if you are from a country outside of the EU) at the University's International Study Centre (ISC). You can call the ISC on +44 (0) 1273 339333 to discuss your options. You can also complete the online application form or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers.

If your English language is not at the required level (IELTS 6.5 overall), we have a range of Pre-Sessional English programmes that you can enrol on before starting your degree course. You will not need to take an IELTS test after completing one of our Pre-Sessional English programmes.

How to apply

Research community

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry.

English is a thriving subject area with a strong research culture in language, linguistics, literature and creative writing that is internationally recognised and of a high collaborative standard. There are currently two research groups in English: the Centre for Intercultural Politeness Research and the Stylistics Research Centre. Current individual staff research projects also include: Grist: The Anthology of New Writing and The Anne Clifford Project.

100% of research produced by History at Huddersfield is internationally recognised, and two thirds of this is internationally excellent or world-leading; we more than doubled the amount of world-leading research we produced since the last REF. Our impact case studies scored particularly highly, being rated 20% world leading and 50% internationally excellent - REF 2014.

We extend our knowledge and understanding of History through the production of high quality work, with funding coming from the AHRC, ESRC, the Wellcome Institute, the Leverhulme Trust and other significant grant providers. As part of this process we have also invested in early career members of staff with great success.

There are currently four Research Centres in History: the Arms and Armour Research Institute, the Archaeogenetics Research Group, the Academy for British and Irish Studies, Centre for Visual and Oral History. Current individual staff research projects also include: Mental Health and Learning Disabilities: Heritage and Stigma and Making the Tudor Viol.

For more information, see the Research section of our website.

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