Intercultural Communication MA 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

Come along to the Postgraduate Study Fair on Tuesday 7 March, 3-6pm to find out more.

About the course

This course provides a high quality education at Master's level in Intercultural Communication, based on the teaching and research strengths of a well-established team of English language scholars.

The course will help you to obtain a systematic and broad understanding of key aspects of intercultural communication.

An important advantage in taking this course is that it merges academic knowledge with practical analytic skill. You will acquire a sound knowledge of how to analyse and interpret interaction via English within and across cultures, developing professional skills that are highly relevant to the job market.

You will have an option to learn a foreign language, which helps you finding high-profile jobs in the market.

There is an emphasis on analysing English language in use, including spoken and written language.

You will learn how to use different methods of analysis and based on a range of theories of culturally appropriate language use.

Your tutors are active in their own specialist areas and recognised by the Higher Education Academy.* You can be confident that your studies are led by experts with flair and enthusiasm, renowned nationally and internationally for their excellence in teaching and research. As leading researchers in their fields of expertise, your tutors are published authors, award-winners and acclaimed thinkers. Indeed, 75% of work submitted for the most recent Research Assessment Exercise was said to be 'internationally significant' and 'world leading'. (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

We have a vibrant research community of both national and international students. We regularly host conferences which reflect the research interests of our academic staff, and research seminars by our own students, staff and visiting guest speakers.

Linguistics is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Intercultural Politeness Research, which hosts internationally-reputed experts and which operates with the support of the Linguistics Politeness Research Group.

Linguistics is also home to the internationally-recognised Stylistics Research Centre and English academic staff have held official positions in the Poetics and Linguistics Association (PALA) the world's leading organisation for the study of linguistics.

  • permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching

Start date:
25 / 09 / 2017

Duration:

2 years part-time

Entry requirements

We require a Honours degree (2:1 or above) in a relevant subject.

•  Other relevant qualifications and/or experience may be considered.

•  For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 7.0 overall with no element lower than 6.5, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent.

Contact:

Admissions Tutor
Tel: 01484 478426/472375
E-mail: MHMpostgrad@hud.ac.uk

Places available:

Up to 20

(this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Apply now Book on an Open Day or Study Fair Order a prospectus Ask a question

Course content

You take 180 credits at Master's level. As a part-time student, you take 3 modules per year, based on staff availability and the number of students on the course, from:

Core modules:

Key Concepts of Intercultural and Business Communication

Key Concepts of Intercultural and Business Communication aims to provide Master's level introduction into intercultural communication, with special focus on intercultural communication in business settings, by giving you an overview of the main concepts as well as the key methodological and data issues of the field. The module aims to conceptualise ‘culture’ and ‘language’ in a critical way, showing that accounts which describe intercultural interactions in terms of clear cross-cultural differences tend to be either ideologically or methodologically biased. Such biased accounts can cause major failures when analysing interaction in various settings, such as those in professional business. You are offered an overview of various approaches to conducting both micro-level and macro-level analyses of culturally situated language use. The module also aims to train you to individually collect and analyse intercultural communicational data, from the business world and elsewhere.


Dissertation (Intercultural Communication)

The module aims to guide you through a process of producing original research in intercultural studies, including general research skills, background reading, research and writing up. As it progresses, the experience becomes individualised to suit your own interests and projects. As part of this process, you present your research at our annual Postgraduate Conference.

Option modules Choose two from a list which may include:

Interpersonal Communication

This module is about understanding and exploring what happens to and between people when they interact (chiefly, but not exclusively, through the use of language): how they convey their ‘meanings’; how they project their views of themselves, of others present, of their relationship with those others and of what is going on; how they interpret and evaluate what other people say; how these understandings make them feel. The module looks into both the macro-level and micro-level features of interpersonal interaction, providing a powerful analytic tool for you to analyse culturally situated language use.


Analysing Spoken Communication

This module involves advanced study of the fundamental features of interaction, and exploration of a method for conducting detailed analysis of talk within and across cultures. It covers a range of different kinds of communication (from ordinary talk to formal news interviews) and explores the relationship between language and context in a range of culturally situated settings. As well as acquainting you with many of the central underlying patterns by which interaction operates, it also examines cutting-edge research on issues such as affiliation and action adjustment. Much of this research is drawn from Conversation Analysis, and we will explore and critically assess main features of its methodology and findings.


Analysing Written Communication

This module aims to equip you with a set of analytical skills used for the identification and evaluation of the linguistic devices which encode ideologies in spoken and written texts. The module’s case studies will include the advanced study of Critical Stylistics in a range of different texts, including both spoken and written texts.


For one of your two options, you may wish to enhance your skill in a foreign language and study intercultural communication in multilingual settings. Choose from a variety of modern language modules

Modern Foreign Language modules can be chosen from the available range and entry levels appropriate to the student's prior experience and knowledge.

You take the core module Key Concepts of Intercultural and Business Communication in your first term and the Dissertation in your last term (whether full-time or part-time). In total you take three optional modules

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Career opportunities

Graduates from the programme will be well equipped for a range of careers including teaching, publishing, broadcasting, writing, PR, marketing, advertising, and management. In addition, the discipline specific skills – in particular the skill of analysing interaction on both macro- and micro-levels – will equip graduates well for advanced study and/or subject specific careers including advisory jobs for multinational companies and private/public organisations which need expertise in intercultural matters. The variety of specialist knowledge developed will also be of benefit in careers in research, policy planning, or NGO work.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by lecture, seminar and workshop activities. All teaching is supported by opportunities for individual feedback and consultation with staff. You are encouraged to participate in classes by a variety of teaching methods, including group and pair work and by the use of presentations. Assessment includes essays, projects and dissertations. All work is moderated and subject to second marking and external examining.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of the teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.*

• permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching

Facilities

Our language and linguistics facilities include flexible learning rooms equipped with video conferencing equipment, language laboratories with specialist software, interactive smart boards with all-round ceiling projection and audio-visual cabinets with the usual cd/dvd playback and pc and laptop connections.

In the University Library and Computing Centre (LCC), you will find language and linguistics subject specialists to help you find and use source materials. The LCC contains modern IT facilities with 24-hour access and comfortable spaces for you to work alone or in small groups. It also contains our rapidly-expanding collection of linguistics materials, including journal and newspaper articles, books, audio recordings, and a range of electronic databases, including:

•  the Oxford English Dictionary Online;

•  a range of databases including ProQuest Newsstand, Early English Books online and the International Encyclopaedia of Linguistics;

•  corpora for studying language including the British National Corpus. These are all supported by a range of software for the computational analysis of language.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the part-time tuition fee for UK and EU postgraduate students at the University of Huddersfield will generally be £425 per 15 credit module and £850 per 30 credit module (see Fees and Finance for exceptions). Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Funding

In 2016/17, the tuition fee for UK and EU postgraduate students at the University of Huddersfield will generally be £4,950 (see Fees and Finance for exceptions). Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, please see Fees and Finance.

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Other information

You will be taught by staff who are actively engaged in research and publication, at the cutting edge of their various specialisms. You will also be supported by a personal tutor from amongst our academic staff and have access to two Academic Skills Tutors.

Research projects As leading researchers in their fields of expertise, your tutors are published authors, award-winners and acclaimed thinkers. 75% of work submitted for the 2014 Research Assessment Exercise was said to be 'internationally significant' and 'world leading'.We are a very research active department, and we have at any one time a number of research assistants working on funded research projects. Examples of recent projects include the following:

•  Politeness in Taiwan

•  Semantic Annotation and Mark Up for Enhancing Lexical Search (SAMUELS) project: Is there a Baron in the Commons?

•  Babel: The Language Magazine

•  Creating an online PALA museum

We also have an on-going long-term project called Language in Conflict, where we are working with professionals in Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution to enhance the linguistic skills and understanding of mediators and international negotiators by producing instructional materials and running training courses.

Conferences We have a vibrant research community of both national and international students and regularly host conferences which reflect the research interests of our academic staff. Recent conferences include:

•  English Language and Linguistics for A Level Teachers (2015)

•  Stylistics Research Centre 10th Anniversary Symposium (2015)

•  International Symposium of Linguistic Politeness Research Group (2014)

Seminars We run a regular research seminar series which all students are encouraged to attend. This offers the opportunity to hear about the very latest research developments in English language and linguistics. In addition to talks from our own academic staff we frequently welcome visiting speakers from universities in the UK, Europe and overseas. Recent speakers have included:

•  Dr Dominic Watt (University of York)

•  Dr Sam Kirkham (Lancaster University)

•  Professor Beatrix Busse (Heidelberg University, Germany)

•  Professor Christian Kay (University of Glasgow)

•  Professor Xinren Chen (Nanjing University, China)

•  Dr Kate MacDonald (University of Gent, Belgium)

•  Dr Laura Wright (University of Cambridge)

Other activities We are the home of Babel: The Language magazine, which is a popular magazine produced in our department aimed at non-specialist readers with an interest in linguistics and language-related issues.

We also have our own consultancy service called Language Unlocked. Here we use corpus-based and corpus-driven stylistics to undertake consultancies for public and private companies and voluntary third sector and non-governmental organisations whose concerns require a subtle understanding of large bodies of text.

There are numerous possibilities related to both Babel and Language Unlocked for our students.

How to apply

Research community

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant. For more information see the Research section of our website.

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